Preview Plan Information

Grant Number B-02-DW-36-0001 Grant Name State of New York, 9/11 Terrorist Attacks on NYC
Grantee Name Lower Manhattan Development Corporation Grant Amount $2,000,000,000.00
Obligation Date 6/7/2002 Status Submitted - Await for Review


Plan Description The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation was created in the aftermath of September 11, 2001 by Governor Pataki and then-Mayor Giuliani to help plan and coordinate the rebuilding and revitalization of Lower Manhattan, defined as everything south of Houston Street. The LMDC is a joint State-City corporation governed by a 16-member Board of Directors, half appointed by the Governor of New York and half by the Mayor of New York. LMDC is charged with ensuring Lower Manhattan recovers from the attacks and emerges even better than it was before. The centerpiece of LMDC’s efforts is the creation of a permanent memorial honoring those lost, while affirming the democratic values that came under attack on September 11. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development appropriated $2 billion to fund the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation’s initiatives.
Recovery Needs for the Plan The World Trade Center attacks resulted in a staggering loss of life and extensive physical destruction to Lower Manhattan. Approximately 30 million square feet of commercial space was damaged or eliminated, and seven buildings in the World Trade Center site were completely leveled. Critical transportation infrastructure was disrupted or obliterated, including the PATH station, the 1/9 subway line and sections of Route 9A and Church Street. Vehicular access to the area south of Canal Street was prohibited for seven days. As a result of the tragedy, residential occupancy rates in the immediate region dropped to 60%, over 100,000 jobs were displaced, and small and large businesses struggled to maintain viability.
Funding Sources Foundations and corporate and private fundraising
Other Private Funds - various
National Park Service’s Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program (UPARR)

ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THIS PLAN

Activity :  HHD-7722 -- Travel and Tourism per 107-117 - (WTC only)
National Objective Urgent Need
Description History and Heritage in Downtown NYC (HHD) is a proposed joint initiative of museums whose mission is history and heritage and are located in Lower Manhattan including, but not limited to: Castle Clinton National Monument; the Eldridge Street Project, Inc.; Federal Hall National Memorial; Fraunces Tavern Museum; Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Museum of American Financial History; Museum of Jewish Heritage- A Living Memorial to the Holocaust; Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian; New York City Fire Museum; New York City Police Museum; South Street Seaport Museum; the Skyscraper Museum; and the Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island Immigration Museum. The project involves a marketing initiative that will promote downtown as a cultural destination. This project will be coordinated with a broader marketing initiative for Lower Manhattan. The objective for this initiative is to revitalize the member institutions and, in turn, the Lower Manhattan area by making the public aware that this neighborhood continues to be a destination with a unique cultural identity – one of rich historic significance with multiple venues where visitors can celebrate and learn about New York’s heritage and history. This initiative may include, but is not limited to, the following components: 1. An advertising campaign that will focus on the New York metropolitan area and surrounding suburbs in New Jersey, Connecticut, Long Island, and Westchester County. This campaign will attract the “day trippers,” who are currently more motivated to visit this area because their close proximity allows them to visit by car or train. The HHD initiative will reach these constituents through print, transit, and radio advertising. 2. A brochure that will highlight the institutions and that will be distributed throughout New York City and in other tourist venues in the northeast. This brochure will provide general operating information and a map of the area noting where the institutions are located. 3. A twice-yearly calendar and bi-monthly event reminder postcards that will be sent to the consolidated mailing lists of all institutions. These communications pieces will establish a new effort for audience development. Return visitors are key to the continued success of the institutions involved. Joint event calendars and reminder postcards will notify constituents of the wide offering of programs in the area and will motivate visitors to plan frequent trips. 4. A web site that will support both the advertising campaign and the joint communications pieces. A single source for resources and information about the institutions will reinforce the advertising campaign message and the joint nature of this initiative and will be the most cost-effective way for the public to learn more about the museums. Recent findings have shown that most visitors plan their itineraries prior to arrival and many of these visitors use the Internet to research their travel. 5. A poster that will visually underscore the identity and message of this initiative and will be distributed to local restaurants and retail stores as well as being available in each institution’s shop. This poster will highlight the rich diversity of Downtown institutions. 6. A research and evaluation component to assess the impact and value of various parts of the initiative. 7. Finally, the museums will develop joint program days. On such days, each of the institutions will offer programming that, combined, will provide a full day of activity. By joining together, HHD will encourage visitors to venture Downtown for these unique activities. B. Funding Requirements and Duration of Project The institutions are estimating a launch in 2003. They expect this campaign to last at least nine months and have long range effects that will be sustained into successive years. This program is eligible for HUD funding to be used to aid the travel and tourism industry in New York City as allowed and required by the Defense Appropriations Act of 2002, Public Law 107-117.
Location Description These cultural institutions are located in lower Manhattan south of Houston Street.
Dates Start Date 06/14/2003
End Date 07/01/2006
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $4,664,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $4,664,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Sub-Grantee :  Alliance for Downtown New York
Activity :  R2R-7717 -- Administration
National Objective N/A
Description Downtown River to River Festival: The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc. is holding a summer season-long festival of the arts in Lower Manhattan named the Downtown “River-to-River” Festival. The River to River Festival runs from May 2002 to September 2002. The Downtown Alliance’s partners in this effort include the Battery Park City Authority, the Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, South Street Seaport, and the World Financial Center Arts and Events Program. The festival includes free events such as the 5-year old Dine Around Downtown food fair, An American Expression (varied musical concerts), the 10th year of Children’s Day, Summer at the Seaport, the 5th Annual Hudson River Festival, a July 4th Celebration, etc. Such a festival is critical in attracting residents and businesses, as well as visitors, to Lower Manhattan, and the Downtown Alliance has successfully composed an umbrella organization inclusive of most such cultural groups in the area and provides a unique outreach opportunity. The Program includes the following activities eligible under HUD’s CDBG Program: Activity #1 - Prominent recognition of LMDC in all press releases, program literature, handouts, and other promotional materials relating to performances and events. Activity #2 - Prominent feature of LMDC in weekly print advertisements purchased and placed in local newspapers and periodicals and outdoor advertisements located at LaGuardia Airport, PATH train stations, and Port Authority Bus Terminal. Activity #3 - Prominent feature, text button, and hyperlink to LMDC web site (www.renewnyc.com) on Downtown NYC River to River Festival web site (www.rivertorivernyc.com). Activity #4 - Dissemination of LMDC outreach and program information and materials at event tables in late summer. Activity #5 - Table set up at late summer events for LMDC staff to answer questions and discuss LMDC activities and programs and collect contact information, including sign up sheets for electronic newsletter and other updates.
Location Description The summer season-long festival of the arts in Lower Manhattan named “River-to-River” is held throughout the Lower Manhattan area and targets the entire NYC area.
Dates Start Date 06/06/2002
End Date 10/07/2002
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $500,000.00
Other Funds Total $7,125,699.00
Total Funds $7,625,699.00
Funding Sources Foundations and corporate and private fundraising $120,699.00
Other Private Funds - various $7,050,000.00
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Sub-Grantee :  Empire State Development Corporation (ESD)
Activity :  BRG-7718 -- Payment for compensation for economic losses (WTC-only)
National Objective Urgent Need
Description This plan details LMDC's proposed expenditure of $350 million to supplement three business recovery and economic revitalization programs initiated and administered by Empire State Development (ESD), New York State's economic development agency, in cooperation with the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). ESD Action Plan History -- Business Recovery Programs Established by ESD -- Congress appropriated an initial $700 million to New York State for economic recovery and revitalization efforts through HUD's Community Development Block Grant Program. This fund is managed by ESD in cooperation with EDC in accordance with a Final Action Plan and an Amended Action Plan accepted and approved by HUD. The Final Action Plan describes all of the business recovery and revitalization programs. The Amended Action Plan modifies three programs: (1) the Small Firm Attraction & Retention Grant Program, (2) the WTC Business Recovery Loan Fund, and (3) the Infrastructure Rebuilding Program. Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan are available on the ESD web site: www.empire.state.ny.us. Additional Business Recovery Funding from LMDC -- Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan recognized that more than $700 million would be needed to fully fund the business recovery and revitalization programs as described. When an initial $2 billion was appropriated to LMDC, Congress intended that some portion would be directed to the business recovery and revitalization effort administered by ESD. In fact, $500 million of the initial appropriations (the $700 million and the $2.0 billion) is required to be made available to small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and individuals to compensate them for economic losses. LMDC is publishing this Partial Action Plan to allocate $350 million of the $2 billion fund to three business recovery programs administered by ESD as described in ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan referred to above. WTC Business Recovery Grant (BRG) Program -- $150,000,000 (total program fund $481,000,000) -- 1. Overview. The WTC BRG program provides grants to businesses (including not-for-profit organizations) with fewer than 500 employees, located in Manhattan south of 14th Street, to compensate them for economic losses resulting from the disaster. Compensation is calculated based on days of lost gross revenue, with the maximum number of days and amounts determined by business location. 2. Objective. The program is intended to provide compensation for economic losses at affected firms, thereby assisting in the retention of 225,000 jobs at assisted businesses and up to an additional 150,000 jobs at businesses indirectly affected by the activities of assisted businesses. Note that businesses assisted by this program will also be eligible for assistance from other ESD programs. Consequently, job impacts across programs are not additive. 3. Integration with Preexisting Programs. Benefits from the program will be integrated with the previously offered WTC Disaster Retail Recovery Grant Program. That program offered compensation equal to three days lost business revenue, capped at $10,000, to retail and personal service firms with fewer than 500 employees located in Manhattan south of Houston Street on September 11, and continuing in business in New York City. Benefits from the program will also be integrated with the previously offered Lower Manhattan Grant Program administered by the EDC. That program provided grants, capped at $10,000, to small non-retail businesses located in the restricted area of Lower Manhattan, and grants to other non-retail businesses located south of Houston Street tied to application and approval of SBA loans. 4. Eligibility Criteria and Maximum Award Levels. Applicants for assistance through the WTC BRG program must show a business lease, deed or permit that was in effect on September 11th in the areas described below, as well as a new business lease, deed or permit, if relocated, that confirms the on-going viability of the enterprise. 14th Street - Houston Area: Businesses on or south of 14th Street, but not in one of the areas described below, will be eligible for compensation up to a maximum of $50,000. Houston - Canal Area: Businesses on the south side of a line running east from the western end of Clarkson Street, south of the centerline of Clarkson Street to the intersection with Washington Street, then west of the centerline of Washington Street to the intersection with West Houston Street, then south of the centerline of West Houston Street to the intersection of the Avenue of the Americas, then south of the centerline of East Houston Street to the bank of the East River, but not in the areas described below, will be eligible for compensation up to a maximum award of $100,000. South of Canal Area: Businesses in the area on the south side of the line beginning at the intersection of the Hudson River with the Holland Tunnel, and running thence east to Canal Street, then running along the centerline of Canal Street, to the intersection with Rutgers Street, and then running along the centerline of Rutgers Street to the East River, but not in the area described below, will be eligible for compensation up to a maximum award of $150,000. Restricted Zone: Businesses in the Restricted Zone within which all pedestrian and vehicular traffic was prohibited on September 19th (the area bounded by the area south of the centerline of Chambers Street from the Hudson River to Broadway, then the area west of the centerline of Broadway running south to Rector Street and the area north of the centerline on Rector Street running west to the Hudson River) will be eligible for compensation up to a maximum of $300,000. 5. Duplication of Benefits. Assistance received from other Federal Government sources and insurance payments for the purpose of providing compensation for economic losses arising from the events of September 11th will be deducted from grants provided through this program. 6. Projected Total Cost of Program. ESD anticipates making 19,600 awards through the program and a total program cost will be approximately $481,000,000. ESD has allocated $331 million to the program. An additional $150 million is being allocated to this program by LMDC through this Partial Action Plan, bringing the total program fund to $481 million.
Location Description Manhattan south of 14th Street
Dates Start Date 11/22/2002
End Date 06/30/2003
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $150,000,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $150,000,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Businesses 6,112
# of Non-business Organizations benefitting 213

Activity :  SFARG-7719 -- Econ. development or recovery activity that creates/retains jobs
National Objective Urgent Need
Description This plan details LMDC's proposed expenditure of $350 million to supplement three business recovery and economic revitalization programs initiated and administered by Empire State Development (ESD), New York State's economic development agency, in cooperation with the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). ESD Action Plan History -- Business Recovery Programs Established by ESD -- Congress appropriated an initial $700 million to New York State for economic recovery and revitalization efforts through HUD's Community Development Block Grant Program. This fund is managed by ESD in cooperation with EDC in accordance with a Final Action Plan and an Amended Action Plan accepted and approved by HUD. The Final Action Plan describes all of the business recovery and revitalization programs. The Amended Action Plan modifies three programs: (1) the Small Firm Attraction & Retention Grant Program, (2) the WTC Business Recovery Loan Fund, and (3) the Infrastructure Rebuilding Program. Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan are available on the ESD web site: www.empire.state.ny.us. Additional Business Recovery Funding from LMDC -- Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan recognized that more than $700 million would be needed to fully fund the business recovery and revitalization programs as described. When an initial $2 billion was appropriated to LMDC, Congress intended that some portion would be directed to the business recovery and revitalization effort administered by ESD. In fact, $500 million of the initial appropriations (the $700 million and the $2.0 billion) is required to be made available to small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and individuals to compensate them for economic losses. LMDC is publishing this Partial Action Plan to allocate $350 million of the $2 billion fund to three business recovery programs administered by ESD as described in ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan referred to above. Small Firm Attraction & Retention Grant (SFARG) Program -- $50,000,000 (total program fund $155,000,000) -- 1. Overview. ESD and EDC modified the SFARG program to expand eligibility to (a) include firms employing fewer than ten people and eliminated the previous requirement of a minimum of ten employees, and (b) ease lease commitment requirements for those firms located in the area designated as the October 23 Zone. Firms that were eligible for SFARG under the terms published in ESD's Final Action Plan remain eligible without any reduction in previously described benefits. The program modifications respond to community requests for greater assistance to small businesses. 2. Objective. The program is intended to help retain and create 65,000 jobs through the SFARG program at assisted firms. Assisted firms will have an indirect impact upon businesses employing an additional 30,000 individuals. Note that firms assisted by this program will also be eligible for assistance from other ESD programs. Consequently, job impacts across programs are not additive. 3. General Conditions. Attraction and retention of small business establishments is an important, but difficult to achieve, objective of any successful recovery plan. Because there are thousands of small establishments operated by small and large businesses in the lower Manhattan area that will make decisions about whether to remain in the area, it is administratively impractical to provide assistance on a discretionary or case-by-case basis. Thus, ESD and EDC will offer grants to businesses on the following general conditions: For firms operating in the Eligible Area as defined in paragraph 6, the current lease must expire on or prior to December 31, 2004, and the company must sign a new lease, or renew an existing lease for a minimum of five years beyond the current commitment. For firms newly locating within the eligible area, the company must sign a new lease for a minimum of five years. If the firm is located within a section of the Restricted Zone referred to as the October 23rd Zone (the area bounded by the centerlines of Chambers Street, Greenwich Street, Park Place, Broadway, Rector Street, West Street, Albany Street, South End Avenue World Financial Center Esplanade, Murray Street and North End Avenue), the company must sign a new lease, or renew an existing or reaffirm an existing lease. In each case, the new, renewed or reaffirmed lease must expire on or after September 11, 2006 for premises within the October 23rd Zone. 4. New Lease. The new lease must be signed not earlier than September 11, 2001 and not later than December 31, 2004. ESD and EDC may extend availability of assistance if funding remains at the end of the period. 5. Size of Company. Upon application, the firm must employ not more than 200 employees in an establishment in the eligible area. 6. Eligible Area for Location of Lease Space. The new lease or lease amendment is for space located in the area on the south side of the line beginning at the intersection of the Hudson River with the Holland Tunnel, and running thence east to Canal Street, then running along the centerline of Canal Street, to the intersection with Rutgers Street, and thence running along the Centerline of Rutgers Street to the East River. 7. Payments. Except as provided in paragraph 8, ESD/EDC will make two payments of $1,750 per employee to assisted small firms as follows: The first payment will be made upon approval of the application for assistance. The second payment will be made 18 months later based on the company's employment at that time, up to a maximum of 250 employees. However, firms with 3 or less employees will be eligible to receive one payment of $3,500 per employee upon approval of application, in lieu of the two payments indicated above. 8. Firms in Restricted Zone. Firms operating in the Restricted Zone -- the area bounded by the area south of the centerline of Chambers Street from the Hudson River to Broadway, then the area west of the centerline of Broadway running south to Rector Street and the area north of the centerline on Rector Street running west to the Hudson River -- on September 11, 2001 that sign, renew or reaffirm a lease for space in New York City within the Eligible Area defined in paragraph 6, will be eligible for assistance in the same manner as firms described in that paragraph, except that ESD/EDC will make two payments of $2,500 per employee (or one payment of $5,000 if three or less employees). In the event that firms located prior to September 11th in the Restricted Zone relocate outside the Eligible Area, as defined in paragraph 6 above, but within New York City, on or prior to December 31, 2002, ESD/EDC will provide two payments of $1,750 per employee or one payment of $3,500 per employee in the same manner as described in paragraph 7. 9. Projected Total Cost of Program. ESD's Amended Action Plan allocates $105 million for the SFARG program. The increase of $25 million over the original allocation of $80 million, recognizes the additional cost of expanding eligibility criteria to include firms with fewer than ten employees. An additional $50 million is being allocated to the SFARG program by LMDC through this Partial Action Plan, bringing the total program fund to $155 million.
Location Description The area on the south side of the line beginning at the intersection of the Hudson River with the Holland Tunnel, and running thence east to Canal Street, then running along the centerline of Canal Street, to the intersection with Rutgers Street, and thence running along the Centerline of Rutgers Street to the East River.
Dates Start Date 11/22/2002
End Date 06/30/2003
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $50,000,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $50,000,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Low/Mod Income persons benefitting 3,898
# of Low-Income persons benefitting 2,763
# of Businesses 3,594
# of Persons benefitting 16,774

Activity :  JCRP-7720 -- Econ. development or recovery activity that creates/retains jobs
National Objective Urgent Need
Description This plan details LMDC's proposed expenditure of $350 million to supplement three business recovery and economic revitalization programs initiated and administered by Empire State Development (ESD), New York State's economic development agency, in cooperation with the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC). ESD Action Plan History -- Business Recovery Programs Established by ESD -- Congress appropriated an initial $700 million to New York State for economic recovery and revitalization efforts through HUD's Community Development Block Grant Program. This fund is managed by ESD in cooperation with EDC in accordance with a Final Action Plan and an Amended Action Plan accepted and approved by HUD. The Final Action Plan describes all of the business recovery and revitalization programs. The Amended Action Plan modifies three programs: (1) the Small Firm Attraction & Retention Grant Program, (2) the WTC Business Recovery Loan Fund, and (3) the Infrastructure Rebuilding Program. Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan are available on the ESD web site: www.empire.state.ny.us. Additional Business Recovery Funding from LMDC -- Both ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan recognized that more than $700 million would be needed to fully fund the business recovery and revitalization programs as described. When an initial $2 billion was appropriated to LMDC, Congress intended that some portion would be directed to the business recovery and revitalization effort administered by ESD. In fact, $500 million of the initial appropriations (the $700 million and the $2.0 billion) is required to be made available to small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and individuals to compensate them for economic losses. LMDC is publishing this Partial Action Plan to allocate $350 million of the $2 billion fund to three business recovery programs administered by ESD as described in ESD's Final Action Plan and Amended Action Plan referred to above. WTC Job Creation and Retention Program -- $150,000,000 (total program fund-- $320,000,000) -- 1. Overview. The WTC Job Creation and Retention program offers grants, loan guarantees and low cost loans to assist firms with 200 or more employees that were displaced from their workspace for at least one month, as well as other affected firms, and firms willing to create new jobs in the downtown area. 2. Objective. The program is intended to help retain or create 80,000 jobs at assisted businesses and up to an additional 175,000 jobs at businesses indirectly affected by the activities of assisted businesses. Note that businesses assisted by this program will also be eligible for assistance from other ESD programs. Consequently, job impacts across programs are not additive. 3. General Conditions. The program will provide assistance to businesses in the following situations: (a) Businesses located South of Canal Street at the time of the disaster that have remained within lower Manhattan. (b) Businesses located South of Canal Street at the time of the disaster that have temporarily relocated elsewhere because of the disaster. (c) New York City businesses that suffered significant economic dislocation because substantial numbers of their major customers were businesses south of Canal Street. (d) Businesses seeking to locate new operations and create new jobs in lower Manhattan. Assistance will enhance the cost-competitiveness of lower Manhattan location decisions, but will not be used to pirate employment from other states. 4. Number of Employees. Assistance will be offered to firms employing 200 or more. 5. Date of Commitment. Assistance may be made available to businesses that made commitments after September 11th, 2001 and not later than December 31, 2004. ESD and EDC may extend the period of availability if funding is available at the end of the period. 6. Period of Commitment. Assisted companies will be required to maintain jobs in New York City for a minimum of seven years. 7. Assistance. Decisions as to whether to provide assistance and how much to offer will be evaluated on an individual case basis based upon an assessment of the economic value of the project to New York City, risk, location and size of workforce. In addition, there will be assistance for projects for the adaptive reuse of available space to meet the needs of firms with specialized requirements in industries offering substantial job creation potential to the area south of Canal Street. 8. Additional Assistance. Additional assistance will be offered to firms that relocate in lower Manhattan and contribute to the rebuilding of the business community there. 9. Projected Total Cost of Program. ESD’s Action Plans allocate $170 million to the WTC Job Creation and Retention program. An additional $150 million is being allocated to the program by LMDC through this Partial Action Plan, bringing the total program fund to $320 million.
Location Description South of Canal Street
Dates Start Date 11/22/2002
End Date 06/30/2003
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $150,000,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $150,000,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Low/Mod Income persons benefitting 5,725
# of Low-Income persons benefitting 4,058
# of Businesses 94
# of Persons benefitting 37,600

Sub-Grantee :  N/A
Activity :  RGP-7713 -- Residential Location Incentive Grants - (WTC only)
National Objective Urgent Need
Description LMDC Residential Grant Program: Background: The World Trade Center disaster had an immediate negative impact on the housing market in lower Manhattan, which resulted in a significant increase in vacancy rates. The residents of lower Manhattan, particularly in the area south of Chambers Street and west of Nassau and Broad Streets including Battery Park City (“Zone 1”), face a number of concerns regarding the effects of the tragedy such as quality of life issues, transportation issues, and the disruption caused by ongoing construction that will be necessary to rebuild lower Manhattan. As part of the recovery process, the economic impact of many of these issues is being addressed through existing grant programs administered by FEMA, as well as recovery efforts by other Federal, State, and City agencies. Unfortunately, when the initial criteria for this program were first introduced, the lower Manhattan housing market remained depressed despite the efforts that were being made in the area. The United States Housing Market Conditions Regional Activity Report issued by HUD reported that lower Manhattan rental rates were down approximately 10 to 15%. After September 11, 2001, approximately one-third of Battery Park City rental tenants did not return to their apartments. Some rental prices fell 30 percent in Battery Park City and rents in the Financial District fell from 16 to 21 percent on average. Owner-occupied housing saw a similar downturn in the aftermath of the tragedy. Real estate agents estimated a 10 percent to more than 25 percent drop in apartment prices between September and December 2001. By January, very few units had sold in Battery Park City while some were still listed at 15 percent below September prices. Purpose of Program: Lower Manhattan’s residential population is essential to the continued viability of the area’s businesses. Increased housing vacancy rates have a significant negative impact on the area’s economic recovery. Increasing vacancies in the rental and owner-occupied housing markets begin a downward economic cycle, reducing business activity, which in turn makes housing in the area less attractive. Development of an effective program to encourage individuals to remain in, or move to, housing in lower Manhattan requires the creation of significant incentives to encourage individuals to renew existing leases, sign new lease agreements, or purchase residential units. Without such a program, the perceived disadvantages of lower Manhattan as a housing location would continue to adversely impact the area’s housing market and commercial activity. The incentive program outlined in this Partial Action Plan meets these goals. Response to the Draft Assistance Plan for Individuals first announced in February was immediate and positive. Although Battery Park City’s occupancy rate fell to 60% after the disaster, its occupancy rate “rose by several percentage points, to 74 percent,” a few weeks after the Draft Assistance Plan for Individuals was released for public comment. In general, anecdotal evidence from building owners and prospective tenants shows that, after the plan was announced, there was a substantial increase in interest in apartments in the lower Manhattan area. Area Characteristics: The population of the area south of Canal Street is diverse. Approximately half of the area’s residents live within walking distance of their place of employment. Residential income characteristics reflect the area’s industry mix, which includes a significant number of financial service businesses, small manufacturers (including garment producers), restaurants, retailers, and providers of professional and personal services. For example, residents of the area east of Broadway and south of Canal Street have a median household income that is lower than the area west of Broadway, which is characterized by relatively high household incomes. The area of lower Manhattan adjacent to the World Trade Center was attractive to urban professionals because of the presence of the major transportation hub at the World Trade Center and major shopping and service areas located at the World Trade Center and the World Financial Center. These attributes were complimented by the presence of attractive residential units in locations like Battery Park City and Tribeca. In Tribeca alone, more than 5,000 units were converted to housing from other purposes in the 1990’s. The areas of Chinatown, Little Italy, and parts of the Lower East Side have historically been a major residential entry point for immigrants in New York City and include predominantly lower and middle income households. While parts of this area are not south of Canal Street, this area experienced significant inconvenience, disruption, and economic hardship as a result of September 11th. Criteria for Assistance: This program offers substantial financial incentives to offset the perceived and real disadvantages of living in lower Manhattan. To encourage individuals to sign or renew leases or purchase or retain housing, in lower Manhattan, the following categories of grants are proposed: Two-Year Commitment-Based Grants: Items 1 – 6 - These grants provide an incentive to individuals to make a two-year commitment to lower Manhattan. This two-year commitment by residents stabilizes the residential communities adversely impacted by the September 11th tragedy. 1. Rental units and owner occupied housing within Zone 1 (Zone 1 is defined as the area south of Chambers Street and west of Nassau and Broad Streets, including all buildings which face on those streets and the entirety of Battery Park City) will be eligible for a grant of 30% of the monthly rent (or mortgage payments, plus maintenance costs and real estate and related taxes for owner occupied units), up to $12,000 over two years. To provide maximum benefit to lower income individuals in the area, the Plan provides a minimum grant of $4,000 per assisted unit over two years. However, no residents will receive grants in excess of their total two year payments. 2. Rental units and owner occupied housing within Zone 2 (Zone 2 is defined as the area outside Zone 1 but south of Canal Street and southwest of Rutgers Street, including all buildings which face on those streets) will be eligible for a grant of 30% of the monthly rent (or mortgage payments, plus maintenance costs and real estate and related taxes for owner occupied units), up to $6,000 over two years. To provide maximum benefit to lower income individuals in the area, the Plan provides a minimum grant of $2,000 per assisted unit over two years. However, no residents will receive grants in excess of their total two year payments. 3. To be eligible for the grants related to rental units described in Items 1 & 2, all applicants must meet the following criteria: - The unit must be occupied by the applicant and the applicant must comply with one of the following two options: (a) The applicant must have entered into at least a two-year lease commencing prior to July 1, 2002 and ending on or after May 31, 2003; or (b) The applicant must have entered into at least a two-year lease commencing on or after July 1, 2002 and on or before May 31, 2003. - To be eligible for the program under option (b), the following rent restrictions apply: - Rents paid by tenants in rent-regulated units may not be more than the legally permitted rents for rent-regulated units. - Rents paid by tenants in non-rent-regulated units may not be more than the following: - In Zone 1 -- 90% of pre-9/11/01 rents for the same rental unit, plus an adjustment equal to the level of rent increases set for two-year renewal leases by the New York City Rent Guidelines Board. - In Zone 2 -- 95% of pre-9/11/01 rents for the same rental unit, plus an adjustment equal to the level of rent increases set for two-year renewal leases by the New York City Rent Guidelines Board. - These rent restrictions do not apply to newly constructed units coming on line after September 11, 2001 or to units whose rent-regulation status changed or will change between September 11, 2001 and June 1, 2003. - Going forward, these rent restrictions may be adjusted to reflect market conditions. - Leases of existing tenants where the term of the lease is or has been renegotiated will only be eligible if their term expires at least two years after the effective date of the renegotiated lease or at least two years after the date the renegotiated lease was executed, whichever is later. - Tenants must show that their rental payments are up to date (or have otherwise been lawfully placed in escrow). - Payments under the program will be made directly to eligible tenants for up to two years. - One grant will be made per housing unit. - Additional eligibility criteria regarding health, safety, and habitability of buildings may be applied to this program. 4. To be eligible for the grants related to owner occupied housing described in Items 1 & 2, all applicants must meet the following criteria: - The unit must be occupied by the owner applicant and the owner applicant must comply with one of the following two options: (a) Existing owners must agree to remain for at least two years after July 1, 2002; or (b) New owners who purchase on or after July 1, 2002 and on or before May 31, 2003 must agree to remain for at least two years. - Only owner-occupied residences will be eligible for assistance. Owners who lease out their residences will not be eligible for this assistance, but their tenants will be eligible if they satisfy the criteria set forth in Item 3. See Item 5 for possible exceptions. - Existing owners who have completed the payment of their mortgages will be eligible for a grant of 50% of monthly maintenance costs and real estate and related taxes, up to the maximum amounts of $12,000 or $6,000 over two years. - Owners must show that mortgage, maintenance, and real estate and related tax payments are up to date (or have otherwise been lawfully placed in escrow). - Payments under the program will be made directly to eligible owners for up to two years. - One grant will be made per housing unit. - Additional eligibility criteria regarding health, safety, and habitability of buildings may be applied to this program. 5. Units leased or owned for residential purposes by corporations, universities, and other designated institutions may be subject to special criteria. These units will only be eligible for the grants described in Item 1 and Item 2. 6. LMDC will determine whether buildings are in compliance with the criteria of this program (i.e. offering two-year leases and complying with the rent restrictions outlined in Item 3), before its housing units will be deemed eligible. This certification process may vary for certain subsets or categories of buildings. One-Time Grant Per Housing Unit for September 11, 2001 Residents: Item 7 - These grants for residents of lower Manhattan who have continued to live in the area since September 11th provide an additional incentive for them to remain. These grants recognize the value of their commitment to remain in lower Manhattan despite the significant inconvenience, disruption, and economic costs that these areas have sustained since September 11th. Their continued residence has supported the immediate and surrounding residential and business communities during this period. 7. A one-time grant of $1,000 is available per currently occupied housing unit in Zone 1, Zone 2, or Zone 3 (Zone 3 is defined as: the area north of Canal Street and Rutgers Street; south of Delancey and Kenmare Streets; and east of Lafayette Street in Manhattan, including all buildings which face on those streets with the exception of Canal Street and Rutgers Street). Applicants for this one-time grant must have resided in rental units or owner occupied housing in Zone 1, Zone 2, or Zone 3 prior to September 11, 2001 and continue to reside in Zone 1, Zone 2, or Zone 3 through the date of application and the date of award. Residents who relocated within or between the eligible zones will be eligible for this grant. One-Time Grant Per Housing Unit for Families: Items 8 - 10 These grants provide an incentive to families to make at least a one-year commitment to live in lower Manhattan, recognizing that keeping and attracting families is crucial to the stability and vitality of lower Manhattan. 8. Eligible rental units and owner occupied housing within Zone 1 whose household includes one or more children under age 18 at the date of their application will be eligible for an additional family grant of $1,500. One grant will be made per housing unit. The additional eligibility criteria for these grants are described in Item 10. 9. Eligible rental units and owner occupied housing within Zone 2 and Zone 3 whose household includes one or more children under age 18 at the date of their application will be eligible for an additional family grant of $750. One grant will be made per housing unit. The additional eligibility criteria for these grants are described in Item 10. 10. To be eligible for the family grants described in Items 8 & 9, all applicants must meet the following criteria: - The unit must be occupied by the applicant and the identified child(ren) and the applicant must comply with one of the following four options: (a) The applicant must have entered into at least a two-year lease commencing prior to June 1, 2002 and ending on or after May 31, 2003; or (b) The applicant must have entered into at least a one-year lease commencing on or after June 1, 2002 and on or before May 31, 2003; or (c) Existing owners must agree to remain for at least one year after June 1, 2002; or (d) New owners who purchase on or after June 1, 2002 and on or before May 31, 2003 must agree to remain for at least one year. Supplemental Assistance: Item 11 - 11. Abatements and subsidies for the same purpose as the grants in this program will be factored into the determination of eligibility and the calculation of grant amounts for all types of grants.
Location Description For the purposes of the Grant Program the area of focus has been divided into three zones. These zones are as follows: Zone 1 is defined as the area south of Chambers Street and west of Nassau and Broad Streets, including all buildings which face on those streets and the entirety of Battery Park City. Zone 2 is defined as the area outside Zone 1 but south of Canal Street and southwest of Rutgers Street, including all buildings which face on those streets. Zone 3 is defined as: the area north of Canal Street and Rutgers Street; south of Delancey and Kenmare Streets; and east of Lafayette Street in Manhattan, including all buildings which face on those streets with the exception of Canal Street and Rutgers Street.
Dates Start Date 06/07/2002
End Date 12/31/2005
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $280,500,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $280,500,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Properties 1,500
# of Low/Mod Income Households benefitting 12,500
# of Low-Income Households benefitting 8,400
# of Businesses 10
# of Households benefitting 38,000

Sub-Grantee :  New York City Department of Design and Construction
Activity :  IM-0103 -- Rehabilitation/reconstruction of public facilities
National Objective Urgent Need
Description Interim Memorial: The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation will provide funding for the design and installation of the interim memorial for victims of the September 11th World Trade Center tragedy and the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. This use of funds benefits the health and welfare of all of the communities affected by the September 11th tragedy and the nation by providing a place where these communities can come together to remember and commemorate the victims of the attacks during this period of recovery and rebuilding. The memorial is located in a section of historic Battery Park known as Eisenhower Mall, near Bowling Green and adjacent to Hope Garden. The centerpiece of the memorial is "The Sphere for Plaza Fountain,” a monument to fostering world peace that sat atop a granite fountain in the center of the 5-acre World Trade Center Plaza. The Sphere is framed on either side by a row of trees and park benches. The LMDC Board and staff worked closely with representatives of victims' families, area residents, and city and state officials to design the plan for the interim memorial and to identify an appropriate site. A team consisting of LMDC, city and state planners, engineers, and architects designed and prepared the site and installed the interim memorial. Extensive preparation of the site was necessary to support The Sphere. Preparation of the site included landscaping, the installation of decorative stones, and the construction of structural supports to hold The Sphere in place. The Parks Department estimates that approximately 300 visitors per day visit the Memorial.
Location Description The Interim Memorial is installed in a section of historic Battery Park known as Eisenhower Mall, near Bowling Green and adjacent to Hope Garden.
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 01/30/2005
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $350,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $350,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Persons benefitting 300

Sub-Grantee :  New York City Department of Parks and Recreation
Activity :  CPP-7721 -- Rehabilitation/reconstruction of public facilities
National Objective Low/Mod
Description The Renovation of the Pavilion in Columbus Park -- A. Project Description -- The City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation (Parks Department) requested $428,571 for the renovation of Columbus Park’s pavilion, a structure erected in 1897. The project includes rehabilitation to address the decay of the building’s infrastructure. The project expands on recent renovation efforts by the Parks Department and proposes the creation of new community space in the lower level of the pavilion and the refurbishment of the upper loggia for recreational programming. In addition, the project will eliminate barriers and promote accessibility for people with disabilities. The Parks Department has been conditionally awarded a grant of $1 million from the National Park Service’s Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program (UPARR) contingent upon the receipt of an additional $428,571 to meet their estimated costs. The total cost of the project is $1,428,571. Columbus Park is a heavily used neighborhood park bounded by Baxter, Bayard, Mulberry, and Worth Streets. Bayard and Mulberry Streets are characterized by low-rise residential buildings with small-scale ground floor retail. Baxter and Worth Streets are dominated by Chatham Towers, a high-rise middle-income apartment complex, and the large institutional buildings of the City’s Civic Center. The park is the main place for outdoor recreation for adults and children in Chinatown. A wide variety of community-based organizations program recreational activity in the park, including volleyball, basketball, Asian table games, and tai chi. The pavilion was fenced off five years ago when decay of the building infrastructure created safety hazards. Columbus Park predominantly serves low and moderate income households. The area immediately surrounding Columbus Park includes the zip codes 10002 and 10038. Per the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000, over 60% of the households in this area earn less than 80% of New York City’s median income. The Parks Department has already made a significant commitment to the renovation of Columbus Park. According to UPARR guidelines municipalities may apply annually to receive funds for the improvement of one park per municipality. The Parks Department selected Columbus Park to receive the UPARR grant. The Columbus Park pavilion project has received support from an extensive list of local civic institutions, including the Asian American Youth Center, Chinatown YMCA, Chinese American Planning Council, Coalition for Asian American Children and Families, Indochina Sino-American Community Center, New York Asian Women’s Center, United East Athletic Association, and the American Institute of Architects. Plans for the rehabilitation of the park have received the support of varied elected officials, including: State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Council Member Alan Gerson, Congressman Jerrold Nadler, State Senator Thomas Duane, and Manhattan Borough President C. Virginia Fields. -- B. Considerations for Funding -- Scarcity of Recreation Space -- The renovation of the pavilion at Columbus Park has been deemed essential to maintain the overall quality of the park: - Rehabilitation of the pavilion will open a structure that has been closed for five years, free up scarce outdoor space for other activities, and rehabilitate a community eyesore. - There is a need for public space in Lower Manhattan to replace public space lost in the destruction of the World Trade Center complex. - Community District 3, where the park is located, has a population of 164,407 as of the 2000 Census. This area has only .73 acres of parkland per 1,000 people compared with the average of 1.7 acres per 1,000 people for Manhattan overall and the minimum ratio of 1.5 acres per 1,000 people prescribed by the Environmental Quality Review. - The only other Major Parks (defined by City Planning to be parks of 9 acres or more) on the east side of Lower Manhattan are City Hall Park and the East River Park. City Hall Park does not have community recreation space. The East River Park is difficult to access for residents in the Chinatown area. -- Community Development Impact -- The renovation of Columbus Park can play a key role in the revitalization of Chinatown. - The park serves as an important entrance point to Chinatown linking the civic center with the retail and residential areas. - The park is located across the street from the main community building, which houses the only museum in Chinatown as well as one of the largest senior centers. - The park is located one block away from Mott Street, the main restaurant district in Chinatown. - The Parks Department estimates that the rehabilitation of the pavilion, the restoration of existing facilities for public use, and the establishment of new sheltered and indoor space will allow for an increase in park usage of 36,000 users, better serving the growing population of this neighborhood. -- Insufficient Funding -- The renovation has received support from public officials and the UPARR program. However, projected renovation expenses exceed the funding they can provide. Constraints on the City’s budget limit the ability of the Parks Department to otherwise obtain the matching funds required by the UPARR guidelines.
Location Description Columbus Park is a heavily used neighborhood park bounded by Baxter, Bayard, Mulberry, and Worth Streets.
Dates Start Date 07/01/2003
End Date 06/30/2006
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $428,571.00
Other Funds Total $1,000,000.00
Total Funds $1,428,571.00
Funding Sources National Park Service’s Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program (UPARR) $1,000,000.00
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Low/Mod Income persons benefitting 81,320
# of Low-Income persons benefitting 62,557
# of Public Facilities 1
# of Persons benefitting 100,412

Sub-Grantee :  New York State Urban Development Corporation dba Empire State Development Corporation
Activity :  ETAP-0102 -- Econ. development or recovery activity that creates/retains jobs
National Objective Urgent Need
Description Employment Training Assistance Program: An array of job training programs is being provided through existing workforce development programs to help individuals affected by September 11th obtain basic skills needed for employment in the New York City area. For example, New York State received a $25 million National Emergency Grant from the federal government to provide job training, placement services, career counseling, resume preparation, and access to job banks to individuals impacted by the tragedy. The grant, provided through the New York State Department of Labor to 14 organizations offering these services, helps workers dislocated as a result of the tragedy transition back into the workforce. In addition, unemployed individuals can receive training vouchers valued at $5,000 through the Workforce Investment Act for training that prepares them for jobs that are in occupations in high demand. However, to be effective in specific employment settings, new and existing employees often require specific skills not taught in traditional classroom training programs. The customized training needed by individuals for their particular jobs involves special preparation, often in on-the-job settings in the use of proprietary work or production techniques. Plan for Assistance: This program will provide grants to train current and prospective employees of businesses and not-for-profit organizations in the area south of 14th Street. Such grants will prioritize individuals affected by September 11th, specifically individuals who lost wages and worked below Houston Street on September 11th, providing them with the skills they need to succeed at the specific work processes found at those businesses. 1. Assistance will be in the form of grants to businesses and not-for-profit organizations south of 14th Street. These grants will be used for training and retraining for skills specific to the needs of these businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and employees. 2. Eligible firms must employ fewer than 500 people. 3. The maximum benefit will be 50% of eligible training costs. 4. Groups of small firms (so-called training consortia) will be eligible applicants, and could receive a fee of up to 5% of training costs for administration. 5. Up to $10 million will be allocated through this program. 6. This program will provide assistance to between 2,375 and 5,000 individuals. The Employment Training Assistance Program will be administered by the Empire State Development Corporation.
Location Description The geographic area of focus of the ETAP program is businesses and organizations located in the area south of 14th Street in Manhattan. The grants will prioritize individuals affected by September 11th, specifically individuals who lost wages and worked below Houston Street on September 11th.
Dates Start Date 08/01/2002
End Date 02/01/2005
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $10,000,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $10,000,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries # of Businesses 100
# of Persons benefitting 3,000

Sub-Grantee :  New York University
Activity :  LTC-7714 -- Administration
National Objective N/A
Description Listening to the City: The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation’s first Principle for Action states its commitment to making decisions based on an inclusive and open process as it achieves its mission of remembering, rebuilding and revitalizing Lower Manhattan. Critical to achieving this mission is to engage and receive input from all of the various stakeholders all of whom share a commitment to Lower Manhattan. On July 20th, the Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York and other major civic organizations will convene Listening to the City II, a “citizen’s summit” of 5,000 people demographically representative of the region to discuss proposals to rebuild lower Manhattan. The participation of the LMDC will provide the LMDC with an opportunity to receive a significant amount of public input that is broad based and representative of the various stakeholders. This modern town meeting will entail facilitated roundtable discussions that are supported by the latest in networked computer technology. The Civic Alliance is a coalition sponsored by New York University (NYU), the Regional Plan Association, New School University, Pratt Institute, and over 85 business, community, and civic groups representing a cross-section of New York and the Region. Its purpose is to provide a broad umbrella for civic planning and advocacy efforts in support of the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan. The Civic Alliance is partnering through NYU with AmericaSpeaks, a nationally-recognized, nonprofit, and non-partisan organization dedicated to engaging citizen voices in governance by using innovative large-scale meeting techniques and the latest and most effective "decision-support" technologies to ensure that all participants’ ideas are captured and their priorities counted. The content developed for the event will grow out of LMDC’s planning effort and will include the work of civic groups focused on the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan. To ensure the broadest participation possible special efforts will be made to reach out to all of the various stakeholders and communities that were affected by the World Trade Center attacks. Participants will represent residents and workers, survivors and families of victims, emergency and rescue workers, business and property owners, citizens and civic leaders, and citizens from the five boroughs, as well as suburban New York and New Jersey. They will reflect considerable age, income, ethnic, racial, geographic, and gender diversity as well. It also provides LMDC and other decision makers with feedback about how a large, demographically representative group of citizens views a set of issues that LMDC will help frame. The Listening to the City Program will include the following activities eligible under HUD’s CDBG Program: Program Delivery Activity #1 - Outreach to diverse economic, ethnic, and geographic communities in the New York metropolitan area to achieve a participation target of 5,000 individuals in the Forum to elicit comment, input, and feedback regarding the plans for redevelopment of Lower Manhattan, including the preliminary planning principles, ideas, and framework put forth by the Grantee. Such outreach efforts include personal, electronic, print, media, and Web-based strategies and efforts to recruit members of those communities affected by the attacks on the World Trade Center and its aftermath. Activity #2 - Technology to support computerized online and telephone registration permitting immediate collection and daily monitoring of demographic information as well as individual participant systems permitting maximum dissemination of information, control of content and material, and levels of response and feedback during public forum. Activity #3 - Communications-related activities, including advertisements and registrants’ materials, to attract widespread, diverse participation, and extensive media coverage of the event, including the development of an overall communications strategy, outreach/promotion messages and materials, advance coverage, press conferences, and event coverage. Activity #4 - Translation and interpreter services for all outreach and participants’ materials to solicit and permit participation by members of the hearing-impaired and non-English-speaking communities in Manhattan. Activity #5 - Reports on details and summaries of information collected at Forum.
Location Description The Listening to the City II Program is a public interactive forum held on July 20 and 22, 2002 at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City. To ensure the broadest participation possible special efforts will be made to reach out to all of the various stakeholders and communities that were affected by the World Trade Center attacks. Participants represent residents and workers, survivors and families of victims, emergency and rescue workers, business and property owners, citizens and civic leaders, and commuters from the five boroughs, as well as suburban New York and New Jersey. They will reflect considerable age, income, ethnic, racial, geographic, and gender diversity as well.
Dates Start Date 06/07/2002
End Date 09/10/2002
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $500,000.00
Other Funds Total $1,865,078.71
Total Funds $2,365,078.71
Funding Sources Foundations and corporate and private fundraising $1,865,078.71
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Sub-Grantee :  None
Activity :  Gen A-7700 -- Administration
National Objective N/A
Description Planning and Administration: With the creation of the LMDC in December 2001, New York State and the City of New York established a coordinating vehicle for recovery, remembrance, and rebuilding efforts in lower Manhattan. LMDC has secured facilities and staff that will provide planning, administration, and management services related to those efforts as well as the development of plans for the revitalization of the areas immediately surrounding the site of the September 11th tragedy. The initial set of basic principles and guidelines for LMDC’s planning efforts are embodied in a draft document entitled Principles and Preliminary Blueprint for the Future of Lower Manhattan, which has been made available for public consideration and comment. As part of its coordinated planning activities, LMDC has already made, and will continue to make, this and other information available to its eight advisory councils and to the public via the LMDC web site, www.renewnyc.com. In addition, LMDC will oversee and monitor the program administration by others of the Residential Grant Program and the Employment Training Assistance Program described in this Partial Action Plan. HUD has authorized the use of up to 5% of the proposed expenditure, equaling approximately $15.1 million, for costs associated with these planning, administration, and management activities, which includes such additional items as outreach, overhead, and research. General program administrative costs include general management, oversight and coordination of planning and other program activities.
Location Description General administrative activities are centralized in LMDC's office at: One Liberty Plaza, 20th floor, New York, NY, 10006, and cover activities within Lower Manhattan..
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 02/01/2010
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $15,720,954.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $15,720,954.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  Urban-7700 -- Planning
National Objective N/A
Description Planning and Administration: With the creation of the LMDC in December 2001, New York State and the City of New York established a coordinating vehicle for recovery, remembrance, and rebuilding efforts in lower Manhattan. LMDC has secured facilities and staff that will provide planning, administration, and management services related to those efforts as well as the development of plans for the revitalization of the areas immediately surrounding the site of the September 11th tragedy. The initial set of basic principles and guidelines for LMDC’s planning efforts are embodied in a draft document entitled Principles and Preliminary Blueprint for the Future of Lower Manhattan, which has been made available for public consideration and comment. As part of its coordinated planning activities, LMDC has already made, and will continue to make, this and other information available to its eight advisory councils and to the public via the LMDC web site, www.renewnyc.com. In addition, LMDC will oversee and monitor the program administration by others of the Residential Grant Program and the Employment Training Assistance Program described in this Partial Action Plan. HUD has authorized the use of up to 5% of the proposed expenditure, equaling approximately $15.1 million, for costs associated with these planning, administration, and management activities, which includes such additional items as outreach, overhead, and research. Planning activities include the development of urban design concepts in connection with the World Trade Center site and Lower Manhattan.
Location Description The office of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation is located at One Liberty Plaza, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10006.
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 03/31/2004
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $8,296,023.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $8,296,023.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  Envir-7708 -- Planning
National Objective N/A
Description This activity provides for environmental consulting and review in connection with projects proposed for Lower Manhattan.
Location Description The office of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation is located at One Liberty Plaza, 20th floor, New York, NY 10006.
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 03/31/2004
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $4,250,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $4,250,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  N/A -- Planning
National Objective N/A
Description N/A
Location Description N/A
Dates Start Date 02/02/2002
End Date 03/31/2004
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $0.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $0.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  Gen P-7700 -- Planning
National Objective N/A
Description This activity provides for general planning of lower Manhattan, including the following: 1. Housing market and demand studies. 2. Public Space 3. Retail & Arts studies. 4. Urban Design studies 5. Traffic studies.
Location Description The office of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation is located at One Liberty Plaza, 20th floor, New York, NY 10006.
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 03/31/2004
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $3,830,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $3,830,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  CorpD-7709 -- Planning
National Objective N/A
Description This activity includes project feasibility assessments and costing, and economic planning studies.
Location Description The office of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation is located at One Liberty Plaza, 20th floor, New York, NY 10006.
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 03/31/2004
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $900,000.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $900,000.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A

Activity :  NA -- Administration
National Objective N/A
Description N/A
Location Description N/A
Dates Start Date 02/01/2002
End Date 02/01/2010
Funds HUD Disaster Funds $0.00
Other Funds Total $0.00
Total Funds $0.00
Funding Sources N/A
Accomplishments/Beneficiaries  N/A